PEOPLE

Andreas Andersson - Principle Investigator

Andreas Dr. Andersson earned his B.S. in Marine Biology from Hawaii Pacific University in 2001. He received a M.S. in 2003 and a Ph.D. in 2006 in Chemical Oceanography from the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. In 2007, Andersson joined the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) as a post-doctoral fellow and then became a research scientist in 2008. In 2011, Andersson joined the faculty at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Andersson's general research interest deals with global environmental change owing to both natural and anthropogenic processes, and the subsequent effects on the function, role, and cycling of carbon in marine environments. His current research is mainly concerned with ocean acidification in coral reefs and in near-shore coastal environments.

email: aandersson@ucsd.edu
phone: (858) 822-2486
website: http://scrippsscholars.ucsd.edu/aandersson

 

Heather Page - PhD Student

Heather Heather earned her B.S. in Marine Biology and Environmental Science with a minor in Chemistry from the University of North Carolina Wilmington. At UNCW, she researched the effects of suspended solids on oyster feeding physiology. Summer internship programs (NSF-REU and Holling Scholars Program) exposed her to ocean acidification research. After graduating, she worked in the coral and benthic ecology labs at UNCW. She is pursuing a PhD in Biological Oceanography, researching the effect of coral reefs on seawater carbonate chemistry. Her interest in management strategies designed to aid reef resilience to climate change will lead her to examine how inter-species relationships may alleviate or exacerbate ocean acidification impacts on community structure. She compliments her academics and research by remaining involved with public outreach and education.

email: hnpage@ucsd.edu
office: Hubbs 3405

 

Tyler Cyronak - Postdoctoral Research Fellow

tyler Dr. Cyronak earned his BS in Biology and English from the University of Miami in 2004. After obtaining his undergraduate degree he earned his MS (2007) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington while working with Dr. Carmelo Tomas on the phylogenetics and morphology of marine phytoplankton. From there, he worked for three years as a lab manager for Dr. Jack DiTullio at the College of Charleston before going abroad to obtain his doctorate. Tyler earned his PhD (2014) from Southern Cross University in Lismore, Australia while working under Prof. Bradley Eyre and Dr. Isaac Santos. His dissertation focused the biogeochemical cycling of inorganic carbon in coral reef ecosystems. Currently, he is continuing his work on calcium carbonate dissolution and the carbon cycle of near shore environments as a Scripps Postdoctoral Fellow.

email: tcyronak@gmail.com

 

Alyssa Finlay - PhD Student

alyssa Alyssa earned her bachelor’s degree in Geology and Religion (double-major) from Temple University in 2010. She began research in carbon mineralization as an undergraduate and continued this research as a Master’s student, also at Temple University. The possibility of carbonating bioaptite as a sequestration method led her to study the dissolution kinetics of bioapatite across a wide range of temperature and pH. Under the guidance of Dr. David Grandstaff, she completed her Master’s degree in 2012. After graduation, Alyssa received a position as a Staff Geologist for an environmental consulting firm in Brea, California. It didn’t take long for Alyssa to fully recognize her irrefutable passion for scientific research and education, which prompted her swift return to academia in the Fall of 2014. While pursuing a PhD in Marine Geochemistry, Alyssa plans to combine her interest in dissolution kinetics, mineral surface processes, and carbonate minerals to study the effects of ocean acidification on biogenic carbonates.

email: alyssajfinlay@gmail.com

 

Travis Courtney – PhD Student

Travis Travis earned his B.S. in Geology and Environmental Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. At UNC, his research focused on the effects of temperature and ocean acidification on the growth rates and calcite stable isotopic composition of a tropical sea urchin. Following graduation, he worked for Northeastern University and UNC utilizing coral cores collected from the Belize Barrier Reef System to construct century-scale records of coral growth rate and skeletal geochemistry. Travis is pursuing a PhD in Oceanography investigating the physical and ecological drivers of coral reef carbonate production to better understand how climate change will alter coral reef ecosystems.

email: traviscourtney@gmail.com
website: www.traviscourtney.com

 

Ariel Pezner – PhD Student

ArielPezner Ariel earned her B.S. in Environmental Science with minors in Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences and Conservation Biology from the University of California Los Angeles in 2017. Her research at UCLA began on land, where she studied the effects of drought on local plant species in a terrestrial biogeochemistry lab. She later participated in a Field Research Quarter in Mo’orea, French Polynesia, investigating the hiding behavior of Christmas tree worms, as well as the impacts of multiple stressors on a marine alga. She complemented these experiences with summer oceanographic internships in Hawaii (NOAA) and Rhode Island (REU). For her senior project at UCLA, her group investigated whether restored California kelp forests can serve as pH refugia for other marine organisms. Ariel is pursuing a PhD in Biological Oceanography and hopes to continue to be involved in scientific outreach in addition to her research.

email: apezner@ucsd.edu

 

Sam Kekuewa – MS Student

SamK Sam earned his B.S. in Earth Science with a minor in Marine Science from the University of California, San Diego. At UCSD, he researched chemical and physical parameters affecting the spatial and temporal biogeochemical variability amongst Heron Island. Now in a Master's program, he is researching the near-shore upwelling region, influenced by the California Current System, and the spatiotemporal variability of a local seawater bay.

email: kekuewa.sam@gmail.com

 

Katelin Pedersen – BS / MS Student

Katelin Katelin is wrapping up her B.S. in Marine Biology from the University of California, San Diego this fall of 2017 and will begin her Masters degree starting in January. Her research will focus on characterizing the seawater carbonate chemistry of two contrasting reef locations in Bocas del Toro, Panama, in order to see how different physical and biological properties play a role in the functioning and cycling of carbon in coral reef environments. Outside the lab, she really likes to surf :)

email: pedersenkatelin@gmail.com

 

Past Lab Members